Through the lens

The Lens

Through the lens is a page dedicated to film and photograph. Charting Schofield’s course as we navigate industry and creativity. Fair winds and a following sea!

Blacklamp film

In conversation with film-maker and street photographer Luke Forsythe in London last spring, we commissioned him to make a film for us. We asked him to explore the aesthetic of our latest watch the Blacklamp Carbon and come up with a piece of work that could add to the imagery. This beautiful piece of moving image was filmed on location on the south coast of England, the coastline that gave shape, colour and inspiration to the Blacklamp.

Luke comes from a family of photographers and cinema managers and has followed in that tradition becoming a film director and street photographer. He has always been acutely aware of the differences between the two mediums and in recent years he has begun developing a response to this dichotomy.

A film is made by a crew, a photograph often made alone. Film is generally shot and played rigidly at 25 frames per second at a 50th of a second exposure, profoundly affecting the result.

Working alone, Luke uses time-lapse and motor drives reconstructing the conventional way of seeing, a less time based reality is observed.  This film The Blacklamp is part of a series of films he has made in this manner.

The film should be watched in peaceful surroundings. It should be considered much like our Blacklamp manual wind wrist watch.

Tide Time

Mandy Barker is an award winning photographic artist who exhibits throughout the world. Her work is a combination of beautifully crafted photographic images and social commentary. Mandy’s work highlights the environmental issues surrounding dispersed plastic pollution in the world’s oceans and challenges the viewer to understand the problem and to become actively engaged in helping work towards changing it.

Mandy’s work inspired us to think more deeply about our own connection with the sea and our role in helping people to appreciate its beauty and care for its preservation. Having met Mandy and talked some more about her work we decided to support her by commissioning a piece of work called Tide Time. This beautiful piece of photographic art has now become part of our Tide Time project that incorporates all of our Environmental Social Responsibility. Should you wish to buy a limited edition signed print then you can do so simply by emailing us. 5% of the profits are donated to the RNLI Shoreham Harbour.

For more information on Schofield’s environmental social responsibility project Tide Time please visit our dedicated blog here… Tide Time.

Mandy Barker

Mandy Barker is an international award winning photographer whose work involving marine plastic debris has received global recognition. The motivation for her work is to raise awareness about plastic pollution in the world’s oceans whilst highlighting the harmful affect on marine life and ultimately ourselves.

 

 

Visit Mandy Barker’s website

 MANDY BARKER

The Daymark by Simon Cudd

The Daymark is a Victorian structure that sits atop the cliff above and behind the hamlet of Kingswear on the opposite side of the river to Dartmouth in Devon. I discovered the Aid to Navigation quite by accident when running the cliffs in the days when running distance was fun. The Daymark is a lighthouse with no light, a beacon to guide mariners up the river Dart to which the entrance is notoriously hard to find. This grey cone of Purbeck stone has its fingers in the soil anchoring it from bad weather.

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Mr C is a well-known Schofield guy, salt of the earth, all-rounder. He is a professional photographer specialising in watch-world reportage but I happen to know that he can cut some nifty angles when it comes to architecture. Who better to go on a day trip, taking photos of The Daymark in Devon with?

Tim Keeley & Bros

As a boy I spent many hours listening to Test Match Special on the radio with my grandfather in 60 Priory Gardens, Highgate. Afterwards we would take an old and battered bat out to Queens Wood at the bottom of the garden, clear a strip of ground and play out our own international games and run chases. To my grandfather the greats of the game included Hobbs and Sutcliffe, Len Hutton, Fred Trueman and Ted Dexter. I myself preferred the dour obduracy of Atherton, the pomp of Gough and the excitement of Trescothick.

The cricket bat and ball were the tools by which these games were played.  Back then I carried an old second hand bat of my Grandads up and down the garden come rain, wind or shine. In my teens the new Duncan Fearnley Botham bat became one of my prized possessions.  A shiny lacquered surface with bright red stickers that hinted at great deeds to come. That never quite came. Nowadays I still listen to Test Match Special, picturing scenes in far away cricket grounds, hearing the sound of the leather ball hit to the boundary amid the sound of cheering.

Throughout these years and still today one man above all others has excelled in the skills and craftsmanship of bat making. Professionals who have used his bats include my heroes Atherton and Trescothick, as well as global legends of the game like Tendulker, Brian Lara, Joel Garner and Chris Gayle. Name a professional cricketer you admire and it is likely that at some point in his career he has owned a Keeley made bat.

So it was that on a bright and windy day in late September that Giles and I made our way through the narrow and overgrown lanes of Kent in search of Tim Keeley and his brothers, master craftsmen bat makers. By the end of the day I would have my own Keeley bat. Unadorned with stickers of any kind but the most beautiful bat I have ever seen or had the fortune to hold.

We were traveling to see Tim after being introduced to him by PJ. A mutual friend and watch collector. We were making a watch strap out of cricket ball leather and hoping that Tim might be persuaded to use the offcuts of his bats to produce a beautiful wooden presentation box. It is now that our collaborations have come to fruition

The yard is a confusion of wood, workshops, tractors, wheels, old Landrovers and engine parts and most importantly willow.  he overriding smell is that of wood shavings, polish and diesel. Having met Tim, a tall, solid man with a greying beard and a warm local accent we were taken into his barn.  Standing along the walls of the barn are old bats previously used by some of the most famous names in the history of cricket, Dexter, Tendulker, Hutton, Lara, Gooch, Gatting, the list goes on. Having been introduced to his brothers we embark on an extended tour. We watch as Tim shows us through the bat making process, how he assesses the pieces of wood, holds them in his hands, feels their weight, balance, tests the ‘sweet spot’ on each bat and categorises them accordingly; an international quality bat placed here, one for a county player there. Each bat is individually assessed, every aspect taken into account. It is a finely honed process learnt over many many years.

Tim Keeley is a legend of the bat making world, an apprentice at the age of 16 to the late great John Newbery of Newbery bats fame. He grew up on the timber mill at Robertsbridge and has never left it. I tell Tim about my love of the game, its idiosyncrasies, its character and characters. The way a game mimics the cycle of the seasons, the movements of the overs, the weeks. An endlessly subtle and emergent game that matures over time.

Soon enough we make our way up to the polishing shed where the bat that Tim has been crafting is finished and polished, shiny and pale like bone. As we stand watching the machine turn Giles suggests that I would love to own a Keeley bat. Tim takes in the request and then, very kindly, offers me the bat just finished.  A bat from the master bat maker and his brothers, a perfectly crafted piece of wood to treasure. An experience to remember as we make our way back towards Sussex as the clouds roll in and the light begins to fade.

To purchase a Schofield cricket ball strap click straps in the menu.

Somewhere Up North down South

The ‘shutter plank’ is the last plank fastened into the hull of a wooden boat. It effectively closes the hull. This is considered to be a major milestone in the construction of any wooden yacht and the occasion is traditionally marked by a celebratory dram of whiskey. Hence why it’s more commonly known in nautical circles as the ‘whiskey plank’.

Earlier this year, Ben Harris’ beloved hand built wooden cutter, Alva, broke her moorings in a storm and smashed against rocks in Falmouth harbour. After months of delicate reconstruction work Ben invited Schofield to be part of this symbolic event in Alva’s renaissance. It seems fitting that a watch inspired by the Lighthouses that once watched over boats like Alva, should play a role in her restoration. So with a Schofield Signalman DLC on his wrist to keep him on schedule and a beautiful Ladyfinger in his back pocket to sharpen his trusty pencil, Ben set about the precision job of closing Alva’s hull.

Documentary Photographer ‘Somewhere Up North’ went down south to capture the moment.

The Balvenie

Located in Dufftown on Speyside, in the north-east of Scotland, lies the Balvenie distillery.

Balvenie is a single malt distillery using traditional whisky making techniques to produce some of the finest whiskies in the world. Balvenie prides itself on the craft that goes into each bottle of whisky. Unique amongst Scottish single malt whisky distilleries Balvenie grows its own malt, sown on the 1,000 acre Balvenie Mains farm. It is also the only distillery to maintain and operate a working floor maltings in the Scottish Highlands. Balvenie also has its own in-house coppersmith to look after the stills and a team of coopers to prepare the casks and keep everything ‘wind and watertight’.

A couple of years ago Giles and Matt were lucky enough to explore the Balvenie distillery and had an amazing weekend of drink and food ending with a canoe journey down the Spey and a dram and blether in the local pub. Why did this happen? Schofield Watch Company partnered with The Balvenie, with Giles doing a talk at a whiskey fair and judging The Balvenie’s Master of Craft competition. A perfect synergy with a brand/whisky we admire.

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Lambs Navy Rum

Lambs approached Giles with a view to doing a photo shoot, a video and an interview. They felt that Schofield represented luxury craft. He obliged and they reciprocated the favour with copious bottles of rum, tots of which are rationed daily amongst Schofield staff.

Giles Ellis for Lambs Navy Rum